England PM’s dog is a puppy mill rescue

From Wales online:

The ‘wonky’ Welsh puppy who is Boris Johnson’s new Downing Street dog

The little Jack Russell cross puppy with a misaligned jaw was abandoned by a puppy farmer

Who on earth would kill adorable Dilyn?

The new dog set to reside at Downing Street has been rescued from the South Wales Valleys.

At just 15-weeks-old, the little Jack Russell cross puppy named Dilyn nearly found himself being shot or drowned after being abandoned by a Welsh puppy farmer.

2019 reaches average bans per year

We’ve tracked animals sales bans all the way back to 1952. But the movement to end the sale of dogs and cats and sometimes rabbits, ferrets, pot-bellied pigs, long-lived birds and large reptiles didn’t pick up steam until Albuquerque in 2006 and then South Lake Tahoe in 2009.

Pet Sale Bans by Year

We take our average bans per year starting in 2006 where we had 1. It also includes 2009 where we had 1. As you can see in the graph, it also includes banner year 2016 with 103 bans.

We’re a bit late in the year to only reach average. Some years, however, like 2016, saw a majority of their bans enacted in the Autumn including in and around the Thanksgiving holiday and some in December.

The latest ban as of today is in Oveido, Florida, where super hero activist Michelle Lazarow convinced yet another Florida city to pass a ban. She states in an Orlando Sentinel article from July 22, 2019

[Lazarow] doubts the Legislature will pass statewide regulations strong enough to completely ban stores from selling dogs and cats from large commercial breeding operations.

“I would love it, but I don’t see it happening,” she said. “And if they’re not going to do it, then let the cities and counties pass regulations on their own, and on what happens in their backyards.”

Lazarow added that it’s important Oviedo enact the ban before a store that sells dogs and cats from large breeding facilities decides to open in the city.

Orlando Sentinel, 7/22/19

The average bans per year count is found in the bottom row of our graph, “Avg/yr since ’06: 29.”

We’re looking forward to seeing the average bans rise to 30 this year. To do that, bans passed in 2019 need to reach a total of 36. 7 more to go!

Salinas simply won’t go away

The Deep South of the state of California has been trying to rid itself of multiple store owner David Salinas for six years.

San Diego was the first to throw one of his stores out in 2013.

Then Encinitas and San Marcos in 2015.

Then Oceanside and Carlsbad in 2016.

Solana Beach, Vista and Del Mar passed preventive ordinances to make sure he didn’t come there.

Then the great state of California passed a comprehensive ban of retail sales of dogs, cats and rabbits in October 2017, effective 1/1/19.

But he’s still at it.

Activists have had enough.

National City still has 2 puppy stores open and doing the business of passing on the progeny of tortured, malnourished, sickly, spirit-broken dogs onto unknowing customers for a substantial premium.

Salinas is not going easily into that good night. He surely doesn’t want to let go of his easy money stream so he is hanging on with all his might to the last torn threads surrounding the state’s language loopholes.

But activists are there to virtually tar and feather him every step of the way.

Thank you southern California activists, for leading the way on fighting these stores to the bitter end and showing the rest of the country the steps they might have to take when their states pass a comprehensive retail animal sales ban.

1st of 5 Washington Bans to have a Store

Kitsap County is the first of 5 total bans that includes a retail store. The County’s proximity to Seattle could prod the slow poke into action.

On 7/22/2020, the first ban in Washington that had a store in its jurisdiction will be in effect in Kitsap County. The store owners of 43 years are upset and cite that their puppies sell for $1200. So they must be good? To those that buy a pup for that price when you can get an awesome dog at a shelter for from $25-100, we say:

There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute.

Unknown [wasn’t P.T. Barnum]

This is Washington’s 5th ban including a rabbit sales ban in Gig Harbor. But the significance of a ban with a store, and a very long time one at that, could someday influence slow poke Seattle just across Puget Sound from all 5 current ban jurisdictions.

Kitsap County not far from Seattle in King County Washington.

One has to wonder why the store owners are crying foul. How many dogs do you think they might sell on average per week? Think 5 is reasonable? With as many as 25 per week at Christmas, we’ll call 5 a lowball.

5 x 1200 x 52 x 43 = $13,416,000. Let’s call the lowball estimate vs. the expenses a wash, making this figure pure profit.

Isn’t $13 million enough for a lifetime? Or is this proof positive yet again that store owners and the puppy dealers that transport the dogs from the mills to the stores are drowning in their own filthy greed?

Wales Publishes Responses to Proposed Dog & Cat 3rd Party Sales Ban

Welsh GovernmentYesterday the government of Wales published the long-awaited document reviewing submissions of comments (“consultations”) by the public. Remarks were submitted by 458 agencies, organizations and individuals in the open period from 19 February – 17 May 2019.

The results are quite as expected. Near unanimous support with a few eye-rollers: the typical fatuous argument that a ban won’t completely end the industry so why bother to do anything at all.

Blue Cross, an animal rescue and rehoming agency active in Wales, Scotland and England since 1897, had this to say:

We don’t agree that just introducing a ban on thirdparty sellers will have any impact on those sellers that make large profits and choose to operate outside the licensing regime. We believe that before introducing a potentially knee jerk piece of legislation, the government must assess the scale of the third party trade in puppies and the impact any such ban would have on licensed large scale breeders.

Blue Cross submission to the Gov’t of Wales Call for Consultation on ending third party sales of dogs and cats.
Emphasis ours.

They go on about stricter regulations being the best course. We in the ‘States know this strategy simply does not work as most governments are unwilling to put additional staffing and revenue/expense burdens on those budgets already stretched, which the route of strong restrictions causes en masse.

Flag of Wales

New York City is a showcase for this. NYC’s strong restrictions of dog and cat retail sales have proven near-completely unenforceable and sales go on largely unchecked, while their outright ban of rabbit sales has put a stopper on the rabbit overpopulation problem by directly ending impulse purchases in pet stores.

The English ban is set for enforcement on 1 April 2020. The law was deemed Lucy’s Law after news about a spaniel in a typical puppy mill horror situation achieved viral status in the UK. Lucy was imprisoned in a puppy mill in Wales.

Lucy tugged at the Brit’s heartstrings when photos of her fused hips and curved spine from years of living an empty life of nothing but breeding went viral on social and news media. This image is from a Sky News May 19, 2019, article: ‘Lucy’s Law’ puppy farm ban set to be confirmed.

Welsh activists have called on their government to “beat the English to it.” With Lucy’s Law laid in the spring of this year the Welsh government would have to move swiftly, mandating enforcement in less than 8 months, to win the race of taking this critical step in ending animal cruelty in the British Isles.

Either way, England and Wales are now the de facto model to the world of how a countrywide ban can be enacted through the determination of activists to bring about change.

End the suffering.

1st Comprehensive Pet Sales Ban Since Flagler Beach, FL, 12/02

Lisle, Illinois, smack-dab in the center of a contentious area where dog, cat and often rabbit bans are passed and sometimes passed over; where the state legislature missed the mark on a statewide ban back at Thanksgiving, 2015, when they were on track for the first statewide ban on the sales of dogs, cats and rabbits in the world, has set a new milestone.

The little village of Lisle has passed the first comprehensive ban on the sale of all animals in retail stores for the first time since Flagler Beach, Florida, back at Christmas, 2002, which reads:

§ 5-17. – Prohibited acts.

(f) Breeding or sale of animals. It shall be unlawful for any person to breed or sell animals, or dispose of such animals for any commercial gain or other commercial purpose within the city.

(Ord. No. 2002-30, § 1(Exh.A), 12-12-02; Ord. No. 2009-11, § 2, 6-25-09; Ord. No. 2009-13, § 5, 8-6-09)

Municipal code

Surfside, Florida also passed a comprehensive sales ban in February 2014.

§90-41. – Regulated uses.
(d)(26)Provided that no animals including without limitation dogs, cats, ferrets, rabbits, turtles, gerbils, hamsters, cows, horses, sheep, and other domestic animals or livestock shall be sold on the premises.

Municipal code

A few ordinances have included pot-bellied pigs: 2 in Nevada and 1 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Ferret sales were included in bans in 3 bans in Michigan (2 also included long-lived birds and large reptiles) and 2 in Florida.

Activists in states with notably large ban quotients, notably New Jersey and Florida, have stuck to dogs and cats only. Out of Florida’s 64 bans as of this writing, only 5 include rabbits or 4/5 of 1%.

New Jersey has no rabbit bans by our count even though neighboring New York City has a full ban on rabbit sales while only meager, unenforceable strong restrictions on dog and cats sales.

Some in the animal rights and protections movement have long called this selectivity as speciesist: favoring one species over another. The problem of animal farming is the same for dogs, cats, rabbits, ferrets, pot-bellied pigs, long-lived birds, large reptiles, not to mention the serious trafficking in endangered species and species groups of insects and arachnids.

Some argue that just getting dogs and cats passed can be a difficult enough fight. But the argument is strong for ferrets as they are even more at risk as many who take them on don’t have a clue what they bargained for. As in puppies and kittens, ferrets are often the impulse purchase in a pet store, many of them the larger national chains. If not taken well care of, ferrets can produce a copious amount of urine the smell of which is not easily reduced let alone eradicated. They have prodigious energy and need a lot of exercise and if they don’t get it they get sick. There are massive ferret rescues, usually in rural areas, that can’t keep up with the need of talking on castaway animals.

Why ferrets should always be included in bans.

The rabbit story is as bleak, as witnessed by New York’s ban. Rabbits grown in hutches for pet stores and not the same breeds in the wild. A family sees a bunny in the pet store near Easter. “Mommy, I have to have one!”

“No, sweetie, we can’t take care of it.”

“But half my schoolmates have one!”

“Maybe next year….”

“I WANT A RABBIT!”

“Can you please add this bunny to my tab.”

But rabbits need a lot of care and attention. They should have at least yearly checkups and should be taken in if they stop eating, are throwing up, are lethargic, you get the picture. Bunnies need a lot of exercise, but they are not built to spend days and nights outside like the cottontails that live in the bush. Some people in northern climates are astonished when the bunny they relegated outside perished before Halloween. Many in the south have no idea their bunnies aren’t built for the heat. If they do survive outside for very long, they’ll eat your vegetation, which leads to the choice of letting them off in the park or the edge of town or near the creek which will either kill them or have them propagating like, well, rabbits and altering the long-standing balance of Nature.

Altogether too often the family brings home a pregnant rabbit, or two rabbits that mate, and a bunny family is running the house before you know it.

Rabbits should always be on a ban list.

Large reptiles can outgrow their welcome in a few years and are often dumped in the sewer system, in swampy areas like the everglades or bayous, near rivers, creeks, streams and lakes where the non-indigenous animals can wreak havoc on the micro-eco-system or inundate entire regions. They should be on all ban lists.

Long-lived birds are often made up of endangered species and are often trafficked illegally with phony papers, similar to the lies about where puppies come from, “We would never buy our pups and kittens from a puppy-mill, never!

And there’s the long-lived part. Who knows how old the bird you have gotten is. They may live another 100 years. Who will care for them when you are no longer able to, another rescue?

Rats, mice, gerbils, chinchillas, it’s all the same.

Nightmares for the folks back at home, the animals brought home are often sick, behavior challenged, and need more care than anyone in the home has time for. They languish in lives that are not ideal, especially when it comes to the exercise and exploring nearly every animal needs to have optimum health, let alone an appropriate and varied diet.

We hope this first ban of all animals sold in retail pet shops takes off as much as the ban on dogs and cats has.

Activists in jurisdictions that have had success in dog and cat retail sales bans should consider re-visiting their City and County councils and amend the bans to include these species as undergoing the same conditions and travails (and possible extinction) pet mill dogs and cats do. All of these animals are just as individual as a dog or a cat. All of them feel pain, feel sickness, indeed sadness in a melancholy life in a cage or glass too small for them, eating a poor an unvaried diet, and aren’t able to explore, smell, climb, slither, poke, sniff, swim, jump, run as all animals are meant to do.

Dogs, cats, rabbits, ferrets, pot-bellied pigs, large reptiles, long-lived birds should always be included in bans, if not a blanket ban on the retail sale of animals for the very same reasons and definitions.

Rabbit Sales Bans on the Rise

According to our count, rabbit sales bans now stand at 40 jurisdictions, a 10% increase in rabbit sales bans in the past 3 months.

Recent jurisdictions where rabbit bans were included in ordinances:

  1. Downers Grove, Illinois, 3/2019
  2. Gig Harbor, Washington, 5/2019
  3. Bellevue, Pennsylvania, 6/2019
  4. Royal Oak, Michigan, 6/2019

We keep count of rabbit bans in our Icon Legend section under the Google Map:

icon legend
Hovering over the icon brings up a larger instance of the related count.
icon legend
Hint: Selecting the icon, its caption or the count number takes you to the Brief section for that category which describes how we arrive at our count and other details.

Our 6 years running Google Map gives specifics, either by drilling down on the map, or referencing the side bar where icon counts are listed by type.

Floating Menu > Maps/Charts > Google Map

Open the side bar with the icon

To reveal

Use the “v” drop down divot or click “….xx more” to see the full list.
Royal Oak, Michigan, the most recent ordinance to include rabbit bans, also bans sales of ferrets. Previous Michigan bans included bans on reptiles sales and long-lived birds.

Of interest: New Jersey with over 100 ordinances banning puppy and kitten sales has only 1 jurisdiction we are aware of that bans rabbit sales.

New York does not ban puppy and kitten sales, opting for a nearly unenforceable strong restriction (which should lead them to a full ban in the near future), outlawed the retail sales of rabbits at Christmas 2014.

No New States, But 2 We Haven’t Heard From in a Long Time 🤩

Activists have reported ban passages in 2 states we haven’t heard from in quite awhile.

Michigan had its last ban passage 3½ years ago at Christmas in 2015. Royal Oak passed its ban in June 2019. In keeping with previous Michigan bans, animal sales bans include rabbits and ferrets, though long-lived birds and reptiles are not on the list as previous Michigan townships have included. These birds, living up to 125 years, quite often outlive their human companions.

A lonesome state for some time, Colorado had only passed one ban, in Fountain, way back in 2011. The good news is Fountain had a puppy store that was closed by the ban 8 years ago.

Berthoud, Colorado just passed its ban in June 2019.